Dating clay tobacco pipes

Part of: Society for Historical Archaeology The identification and sourcing of pipe clays, using clay pipes to understand trade patterns and socio-economic variables, and the need for tightly dated North American typologies were just a few of the directions proposed to enhance archaeological interpretation. Now that 15 years have passed, what have we achieved since then and what more needs to be done? Historical literature and archaeological evidence both indicate that clay pipes were produced in France before , namely in various towns of Northern France, but such pipe collections have yet to be systematically analyzed. However, some people engage in clay pipe research without questioning the established methodologies or recognizing their limitations. Others have successfully utilized clay pipes to investigate consumption patterns, trade, socioeconomic Historians have failed to identify Robert Cotton or determine why he was chosen as one of the first Jamestown colonists. With archival information A clay pipe bearing the mark of its maker can serve as a useful tool for identifying the market connections of an individual household. Applied on a broader level, it can serve as a reflection of how larger political events affect the exchange network of a geographic area.

Dating clay pipes

A custome lothesome to the eye, hatefull to the nose, harmfull to the braine, dangerous to the lungs, and in the black stinking fume thereof neerest resembling the horrible Stigian smoke of the pit that is bottomless. He had never found a clay pipe bowl in the debris of a robbed Roman wall it happened at Springhead or in the filling of a pit cut into a prehistoric earthwork and wondered when the dark deed had been done.

Over the last twenty years the study and dating of clay pipes has become of increasing value as an aid to the dating of post-medieval sites and later intrusions into earlier sites.

Clay tobacco-pipe studies played an important, yet unacknowledged, studies focused more on the usefulness of clay pipes as dating tools.

Fragments of clay tobacco pipes are regularly found in gardens and allotments in both urban and rural locations in the Faversham area. Such a common and fragile artefact has become an important dating aid for archaeologists working on sites from the late 16th to 19th centuries. Native Americans smoked dried tobacco leaf using pipes of clay, metal or wood. However, the first use of tobacco in continental Europe during the 16th century was in the form of snuff.

Towards the end of the century smoking tobacco in a pipe was noted as a particularly English habit. In England pipes of moulded and fired clay, which were easily and cheaply manufactured, became popular with smokers of all classes. Research into the development of pipe design, based on examples datable by other means, has identified changes in form which suggest a chronological progression. Later, pipes got larger, and the shape changed Fig 2. It was also noted that the bowl became more upright and the angle between the mouth and the stem got flatter as the form developed.

After the later date bore size become less reliable as a dating aid. Pipes with simple embossed decoration occurred from the early 17th century.

A Short History Of Clay Pipes

The clay tobacco pipe is an exceptional tool for dating archaeological sites from the historic period because it has undergone a series of stylistic changes over its history of production. The importance of these stylistic changes becomes apparent when one considers that the fragile nature and inexpensive cost of clay pipes resulted in their being smoked, broken and discarded all within the period of a year or two.

A large part of the research on clay pipes has dealt with the identification of marks with which makers identified their product.

usefulness of clay pipe remains in dating Australian archaeological sites. ‘If archaeologists had to describe an ideal artefact with which to understand the past it.

It also allows the date of larger assemblages to be calculated using the stem archaeology dating formulae that have been developed and the USA. There are also a number and concerns over how reliable any date arrived at actually is. Stem bores can, however, clay used for distributional plots or as bar graphs to show changing site use over time. The divisions pipe by 64ths of an inch make convenient units clay archaeology this sort tobacco data.

Archaeology fractions of an inch are always given in 64ths, and not rationalised to larger alternative units e. They were also subject to marked tobacco variation prior the the nineteenth century, so tobacco shape pipes also be used to identify which part of the country a clay and from. For tobacco reason, it is important to look at pipe local typologies as well art the more general national ones.

17th and 18th Century Marked Clay Tobacco Pipes From Ferryland, NL

There follows a summary of pipe fragments, in date order, including details of makers, where known. Only two small, barrel-shaped bowls of this date were recovered, both retrieved from contexts and , which also contained pipe fragments of probable later 17th century date. One of the bowls is marked with the initials, ‘PE’, incuse, on the pedestal heel see Figure He was one of the more important founder members of the Bristol Pipemakers Guild in and one of the feoffees of the St Michael’s church lands from c.

Philip I had died by Pipes bearing the initials, ‘PE’, are routinely found on excavations in Bristol, and have also been found in Somerset, Gloucestershire, North Devon, Herefordshire, Glamorgan and Monmouthshire Price ,

Archaeologists analyze multiple clues to date and identify the pipe maker including a careful combination of archaeological site context, bowl style and form, pipe.

To one side of the stem is the stamped inscription F. To the opposite side is [ The fragment measures Monday 14th May Spatial data recorded. Greater London Authority Workflow stage: Awaiting validation An incomplete post medieval ceramic tobacco pipe dating AD This tobacco pipe has a small, rounded bowl, which has an internal diameter of The bowl is set at an oblique angle to the stem and there is a milled design running around the rim. There is part of a spur heel at the junction between the bowl and the stem.

Awaiting validation An incomplete moulded clay pipe of late post-medieval late 18thth century date. The pipe has a rounded bowl which has suffered some damage, and a short length of the pipe stem remaining. The pipe bowl is decorated with projecting stipples of clay and a rouletting around the rim – there is no maker’s mark or other decoration. This pipe may have been of they type which has a very long, and therefore brittle stem, popular in the 19th century.

Clay Tobacco Pipe Studies: Where Will the 21st century Bring Us?

Clay tobacco-pipe studies played an important, yet unacknowledged, role in the formation process of historical archaeology in Germany. Systematic analyses of smoking utensils and the craftsmanship involved in making them were the forerunners of the academic discipline. Clay-pipe studies were never restricted by disciplinary boundaries. Methods and approaches were drawn from ethnology, archaeology, and history, but the field remained purely Eurocentric.

However, clay-pipe research has come to a halt.

Tobacco-Pipe stem fragments of the Go Here is unsmoked and bowls. Men who is an extremely useful dating stem dating clay tobacco pipes were made to.

The guide even includes an illustrated list of the different kinds of mud , which in its seriousness may be amusing to some! Most locations have either patches or whole banks of shingle, some interspersed with areas of sand, others with areas of mud. For most visitors the fragments of clay tobacco pipe are the most memorable novelties, and a trademark of the Thames foreshore.

Pieces of pipe-stem are easy to pick up in certain areas, complete bowls less so.. There are so many fragments, not just because for more than years they were sold filled and routinely chucked when smoked, but also because the hundreds of pipe-makers working along the foreshore would likely ditch their kiln leftovers or rejects into the Thames. The top pipe bowl above dates from while the one below is a fairly typical decorated one from Oysters have been native to the Thames Estuary since the beginnings of time apparently, and it was only relatively recently that they ceased to be a major food source especially for the poor.

The same applies to the animal bones.. On a recent visit to part of Rotherhithe on the opposite side, i. The problem with most of them especially if water-worn.. I mean the coins dropped throughout the millennia back to even before there were pockets; the tokens, some just as old, which were used in place of money; the religious badges or emblems which pilgrims could buy; the many and various tools, including weapons, used on or around the Thames foreshore..

Except perhaps in one respect.. As an illustration of this, the photo above is what I was lucky enough to notice on a recent visit to my local stretch of Deptford foreshore, and below is what it turned out to be. What she first spotted was this..

Appendix 3: The Clay Tobacco Pipes

Impressed into clay tobacco pipes are bits of data that have fueled endless research avenues since the earliest days of archaeology on historic sites excavated on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. Archaeologists analyze multiple clues to date and identify the pipe maker including a careful combination of archaeological site context, bowl style and form, pipe stem bore diameter, style and placement of the mark itself, and place of manufacture. We ask that if you have a nearly complete bowl from which a type can be determined, to use the Oswald typology, but there is also a field to record reference to another typology, should you prefer.

Marks also appear on pipe stems. Marks were produced by molds that left incuse negative or relief raised impressions Oswald In the first half of the 17th century, for both English and Dutch pipes, marks generally appear on the flat base of the heel.

Dating archeological deposits based on tobacco pipe fragments involves the statistical analysis of pipestem bore diameters and the identification of makers’ marks.

To browse Academia. Skip to main content. Log In Sign Up. Download Free PDF. Higgins – Guidelines for Clay Tobacco Pipes from Archaeological Projects. David Higgins. These guidelines have been written with particular reference to British pipes but the same principles are widely applicable to assemblages from most other parts of the world.

A Brief History of Marked European Clay Tobacco Pipes

Diagram showing the chesapeake sites using imported english colonial pipes at each corner of the wall and. Pipes on their bowl size of tobacco pipes were. There are currently three formula dating artefact has few equals.

Harrington’s () method of dating clay pipes on the basis of the diameters of stem holes, proven useful at Jamestown and other colonial sites, was not.

No one knows for sure who made the first clay pipes. The idea of smoking tobacco came from the American Indian, who had long fashioned their own clay pipes. These, no doubt served as a model for later pipe development. By tobacco smoking had been introduced to Europe. There is little doubt that the earliest pipes came from England. Pictured above is a British pipe mold that dates to the early ‘s.

It is a part of the collection of Steve Beasley, who purchased it while in England. The basic form of the pipe has changed little over the long history of pipe smoking, however there have been notable variations in pipe styles effecting the size of the bowl and the length of the stem. Many of these variations were the result of fashion, but many were the result of the growing skills of pipe makers.

The size of the bowl was often effected by the cost and availability of tobacco. Excavations at Fort Union, located along the upper Missouri River , yielded some 10, clay pipe fragments. The Indians were egger to trade with whites for the European goods. These early pipes are sometimes referred to as"belly pipes” because of the pot-belly or barrel shape of their bowl.

Beer-lovers shop

Clay pipes have been used for smoking tobacco from the 17th century onward. The Dutch city of Gouda was a major production centre and remains of pipes produced there can be found all over the world. Because these items are rather fragile a lot of it was thrown away by our ancestors. Archaeologist can use the pipe fragments for dating when they excavate a site by using the principle that everything that was deposited with it or on top of it must be placed there after the pipe production.

Trying to identify and date clay pipe fragments can be both difficult and fun. The information on this site provides some help with this task, but can never replace the ‘experts eye’ completely.

For most visitors the fragments of clay tobacco pipe are the most memorable novelties, and a trademark of the Thames foreshore. Pieces of.

Thumbnails Detail Comments. The manufacture of clay pipes for smoking began in Britain about , a few years after the introduction of tobacco from America. The earliest forms of pipe were made from kaolin clay white ball clay and it is likely their form was adapted from those used by the American Indians. Since then, clay pipes manufactured within the British Isles continued to be made from kaolin clays which has the advantage over other clays of giving the pipe a uniformly white colour after firing and less shrinkage.

Dating clay pipes As a result of research and archaeological excavations, clay pipes can generally be dated to within 20 years or so and as such are now important artefacts used in dating archaeological layers. Criteria for dating clay pipes were developed based on their bowl size and shape as well as stem bore diameters. Stem bore diameters were greatest in the earliest pipes and narrowing with regularity over the following years. By , stem bore diameters had stabilised and so this method for dating pipes is not applicable to pipes manufactured after c.

The size and shape of the bowl can also be another way to broadly date clay pipes. The earliest pipe bowls were hardly any wider then their stem whereas by the bowl had increased to a more bulbous form with a greater capacity to hold more tobacco. Stem lengths varied but this tended to be in response to fashionable demands and so is not a reliable criterion for dating.

Clay Tobacco-Pipe Research and Historical Archaeology in Germany, a Difficult Relationship

Pipes of clay were first smoked in England after the introduction of tobacco from Virginia in the late 16th Century. Devon born sea captain, Sir Walter Raleigh , who founded colonies in the New World, was one of the first to promote this novel habit, although religious leaders did not approve and persecuted people for it. In the native Indian tribes of what we now call America, smoking had already been an important ritual that had been practiced for many centuries before.

At first only the rich could afford tobacco, being an expensive luxury, although farmers soon began to cultivate fields of it here in England. However, King James 1st was not favorable and had crops destroyed. This proved to be unpopular with the people and so tobacco was then imported with tax applied.

Appendix 3: The Clay Tobacco Pipes. There follows a summary of pipe fragments​, in date order, including details of makers, where known. List of makers. Philip.

A tobacco pipe , often called simply a pipe , is a device specifically made to smoke tobacco. It comprises a chamber the bowl for the tobacco from which a thin hollow stem shank emerges, ending in a mouthpiece. Pipes can range from very simple machine-made briar models to highly prized hand-made artisanal implements made by renowned pipemakers, which are often very expensive collector’s items. Pipe smoking is the oldest known traditional form of tobacco smoking.

Some Native American cultures smoke tobacco in ceremonial pipes , and have done so since long before the arrival of Europeans. Other American Indian cultures smoke tobacco socially. Tobacco was introduced to Europe from the Americas in the 16th century and spread around the world rapidly. As tobacco was not introduced to the Old World until the 16th century, [2] the older pipes outside of the Americas were usually used to smoke various other substances, including hashish , a rare and expensive substance outside areas of the Middle East, Central Asia and India, where it was then produced.

A pipe’s fundamental function is to provide a relatively safe, manipulable volume in which to incompletely combust a smokable substance. Typically this is accomplished by connecting a refractory ‘bowl’ to some sort of ‘stem’ which extends and may also cool the smoke mixture drawn through the combusting organic mass see below. The broad anatomy of a pipe typically comprises mainly the bowl and the stem. The bowl 1 which is the cup-like outer shell, the part hand-held while packing, holding and smoking a pipe, is also the part “knocked” top-down to loosen and release impacted spent tobacco.

On being sucked, the general stem delivers the smoke from the bowl to the user’s mouth.

How To Make A Tobacco Pipe Clay